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Volunteers Needed! #VolunteersRock

VOLUNTEER with CRC………..it’s a win-win for everyone! YOU – improve your mental & physical health CLIENTS – know they don’t have to face cancer alone Volunteering is not just about making a difference in the lives of others, but also helps you feel good about doing good. Contact Sharon Kaplan, Director of Volunteers at sharon@crcfl.net,



CRC Lending Library

We have reference books you can use here at the center, an extensive lending library, and a limited number of cd’s. Categories of books and cd’s for lending include: cancer in general, breast and other cancers, complementary/alternative medicines, side effects, nutrition, caregiving, mind and body, biographical, social/environmental/political, exercise and relaxation, end of life, humor and



My Cancer

It came without a warning. It rang through my mind like a giant gong Announcing the entrance of a mighty royal person Or the beginning of an era. It shattered the comforting tranquility That clothed my aging body, Already aching from the daily tasks Of staying alive. It startled me. I was first angered by



Kelley Mark (founder of #KnitWithCare) receives award

Interview by the  Maribel Garcia Community Spirit Fund Get to know 2018 MGCSF Awardee Kelley Mark! Kelley sat down with us to answer some questions about her background, her future goals, and why she created Knit With Care. And don’t miss the adorable rainbow teddy bear she made for a member of the group! MGCSF: Please tell us about



Some examples of how your money was used in 2017:

We provided information and general support to over 3,500 individuals. We reserved 452 rides to and from NYC through Cornell’s Campus to Campus bus. We provided financial advocacy and assistance to 194 individuals. We facilitated nine support groups that met 141 times. Volunteers and staff provided roughly 2,800 hours of support to cancer patients at



April is Testicular Cancer Month

Testicular cancer is the most common cancer in men aged 15-34.  The National Cancer Institute provides the following information about testicular cancer: Testicular cancer occurs when healthy cells in the testicles change and grow out of control, creating a tumor.  Most types of testicular cancer develop from germ cell tumors, or tumors that develop in the sperm-producing



April is Head & Neck Cancer Month

The following information about head & neck cancers is taken from the National Cancer Institute.   Head & neck cancers account for approximately 4% of cancer diagnosis.  Head & neck cancers are more often diagnosed in men, and in adults over the age of 50. Cancers known collectively as head & neck usually begin in the cells that line the



National Minority Cancer Awareness Week April

This week we recognize how health disparities affect minority groups and under-served populations. Minority groups are disproportionately affected by cancer. Eliminating health disparities for minorities starts with awareness. Learn more from the Center for Disease Control & Prevention. African Americans have the highest incidence rates of colorectal cancer of any racial or ethnic group, according to the American



April is Esophageal Cancer Month

Formed in the muscular tube connecting your throat to your stomach, more than 18,000 Americans will develop esophageal cancer and over 15,000 people will die from it. Rates of diagnosis have been slowly rising over the past twenty to thirty years. It is treatable, but not curable. The two main types of esophageal cancer include:



March is #ColorectalCancer Awareness Month

Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer in the US and the second leading cause of death from cancer. Colorectal cancer affects all racial and ethnic groups and is most often found in people ages 50 and older. According to the American Cancer Society, the estimates for the number of colorectal cancer cases in



Friendly Correspondent Program

Our Friendly Correspondent Program is a support service we offer to individuals with cancer that may be socially isolated, but still want to have some connection and support from our agency. Volunteers and college students send ‘thinking of you’ cards and notes out to these individuals that could benefit from a kind word and encouraging



Ithaca Times highlights The Boutique

Every year, The Ithaca Times commits one of its cover stories to a number of non-profits in town we think have missions worth supporting. After examining a number of the plethora of groups in town looking to make our community a better place, we’ve identified seven groups we think are worth your time – and



No right way through cancer

I often say that there’s no single right way through cancer. What do I mean by that? Some people aggressively treat their cancers with surgery and chemotherapy long past the time that others would have switched to comfort measures. Some people keep their cancer diagnosis a secret from nearly everyone while others make it a



Cancer on your own terms

I once wrote a column about people who go through cancer with exceptional grace. A few readers said that the column made them angry. The comments were along the lines of, “I’m dealing with a crappy disease and you want me to do that gracefully? Well, phooey on that and phooey on you.” I’m always



Cancer: Simple wisdom from our pets

We’re delighted to announce the arrival of our latest publication! It illustrates our most common pieces of advice with photos donated from the SPCA of Tompkins County. (The photos were submitted by local residents for consideration for the SPCA’s 2018 calendar). Thanks to financial support from the Eagles Club of Ithaca, printed copies are available



The post-treatment blahs

For many people the months following cancer treatment are more difficult than the treatment itself. During treatment, your “job” is to be in treatment. You’re busy with appointments and you see the same doctors and nurses almost every week. At the same time, friends bring you meals, family members take on extra duties, and you’re



Practical advice for getting second opinions

A woman recently diagnosed with cancer stopped by our office to say that she’s heard that it’s important to obtain second opinions from major cancer centers and to assemble a team of experts to provide her treatment. She asked, “How the hell do I do that?” Cancer guidebooks are full of grandiose suggestions like “assemble



Cancer-Related Fatigue

When people think about the side effects of cancer treatment, they usually think about hair loss (which is common with some types of chemotherapy), and nausea (which is not nearly as common as it used to be). But in my experience, fatigue is the side effect that’s most universal and least appreciated. Fatigue is different



CRC statement regarding health care reform

Those of us personally affected by cancer see proposed changes in health insurance in very concrete terms. The changes aren’t abstractions that may affect us at some point in time in the future. Instead, the changes are very real and will affect our medical and economic well-being when a new law is implemented. The House



Decision-making with cancer

Everyone diagnosed with cancer has decisions to make. What type of treatment? Where to have treatment? Should the cancer even be treated? The question isn’t what’s best. Rather, the question is what’s best for you. After working with people making these decisions for the past several years, I’ve found that some general guidelines can be helpful:



Are you a competitive athlete and a cancer survivor?

Jessica Wood, an Ithaca College graduate student in the Department of Exercise and Sport Sciences, is researching “Mental Toughness in Cancer Survivors with Previous Athletic Experience.” She’s recruiting athletes/cancer survivors for a study that provides insight into mental toughness and cancer. A competitive athlete is defined here as an individual who had two years of



Making friends with your oncologist

An oncologist once remarked to me that her patients routinely told her about their personal lives – like they were trying to strike up friendships. I can understand this. It’s not that patients expect their oncologists to invite them over for dinner, but there is a desire to make some sort of human connection. I’m



Connecting cancer scientists and cancer patients

Most cancer research begins in laboratories where scientists seek to understand why normal cells mutate into cancer cells and then travel, wreaking havoc, elsewhere in the body. These basic scientists are generally more familiar with test tubes than with cancer patients. Nationally, there’s growing interest in building partnerships between scientists and patients. For example, review



Why do engineers study cancer?

You probably know that cancer research is routinely done by biologists, but you might be surprised to learn that engineers increasingly contribute to our understanding and treatment of this disease. Here are some examples: Cancer cells migrate through the body to take root in distant organs. These cells have to survive the “flowing river” of



Your doctor can’t read your mind

In the cancer world, patients often differ on what they want to hear from their doctors. Here are some examples: Some patients want to know – in detail – the various pros and cons of every treatment option, while other patients just want to know what the doctor thinks is best. Some patients want to



Nice people abound in the cancer world

One of the volunteers at the Cancer Resource Center recently said to me, “Every person I meet with cancer is nice.” It’s an interesting observation and one that other volunteers have made as well. I’ve been in the cancer world for more than 20 years and I think it’s generally true. Not because nice people



Good care is a partnership between patient and doctor

I spend much of my time helping seriously ill patients navigate the health care system. As a result, I’m constantly talking with patients about their interactions with doctors and other health professionals. Although each encounter is unique, I’m increasingly aware of some universal truths that contribute to good patient-doctor encounters. Not surprisingly, good encounters require



Clinical trials and cancer

People diagnosed with cancer often wonder if they should participate in a clinical trial. When someone asks for my opinion, I begin by saying that clinical trials are essential for the advancement of medicine. For example, one clinical trial found that women with early-stage breast cancer did just as well after a lumpectomy (followed by



Donating hair

We often receive calls from individuals who wish to donate hair that can be made into wigs for people with cancer or other types of hair loss. We’ve pulled together information about some of the best-known organizations that accept donations and some articles that might be of interest. Lather, Rinse, Donate (New York Times) I’ve